Could Egypt’s rare anti-Sisi protests swell?

 

 

Rare protests erupted in Cairo and the port city of Suez over the weekend for the first time in three years, spurred by discontent over rising prices.

Heavy security has been put in place, but could this trigger a wider movement against former general-turned-President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi?

What happened? 

Just after a highly awaited derby between two rival Cairo football clubs last week, scores of protesters gathered in the capital’s iconic Tahrir Square — the epicentre of the 2011 revolution.

Demonstrators in other major cities also joined in a spontaneous outpouring of chants against Sisi’s regime calling for the “downfall of the military regime” and shouting “Leave, Sisi”.

The protests had been called for by Mohamed Aly, 45, an exiled Egyptian businessman in Spain, who in recent weeks has levelled accusations of corruption at Sisi in a series of viral videos which have sparked unprecedented public debate.

Alleging how taxpayer money went into building lavish palaces for Sisi, they have struck a chord with Egyptians who have been bearing the brunt of stringent economic reforms his government has introduced since 2016.

Why are Egyptians protesting? 

“The image with which Sisi wanted to present himself as Egypt’s saviour from Muslim Brotherhood rule… has been completely dismantled”, said Hassan Nafaa, a veteran political scientist at Cairo University.

Sisi led the military ouster of Islamist president Mohamed Morsi in 2013.

Nafaa explained that Egyptians “have been shouldering the burdens of Sisi’s policies”.

He referred to the austerity measures imposed since the pound was floated in 2016 as a prime example fuelling discontent.

“Mohamed Aly came out of nowhere to become a hero in a certain sense. He managed to unmask Sisi,” Nafaa said.

The Egyptian leader has flatly denied the graft allegations as “lies and slander”.

Who is protesting?

Egypt passed a restrictive anti-protest law in 2013 after Morsi’s overthrow and a renewable state of emergency remains in effect.

Sisi’s government has waged an ongoing wide-scale crackdown jailing thousands of Islamists, secular activists and even bloggers and comedians.

The latest example being Mahienour El-Massry, an award-winning human rights lawyer, arrested on Sunday.

The new wave of demonstrators “had not been political before engaging with Aly’s videos. They were shocked with the detailed information he gave,” said Nafaa.

Aly pinpointed villas Sisi had built in recent years in Mediterranean resort towns in Egypt that triggered the ire of many citizens.

“The protesters are those who are socially crushed. They say to themselves ‘we have nothing to lose’ by protesting,” Nafaa added.

How have authorities responded? 

Sisi, currently in New York to attend the UN General Meeting this week, has not commented publicly on the outbreak of small-scale protests. His office did not respond when asked by AFP on Saturday about the demonstrations.

Pro-Sisi Egyptian media have gone to great lengths to show that the country is stable and public squares are under control, broadcasting nightly images of traffic moving smoothly.

The government’s foreign media accreditation body released a statement late Saturday cautioning international journalists that their reporting of events “should not be exaggerated”, without explicitly mentioning the protests.

Security has been heavy with anti-riot police stationed in Tahrir Square in Cairo and in Suez where anti-Sisi protesters congregated for a second night in a row on Saturday.

What will come next?

Aly, the building contractor, has called for a “million-man march” this Friday dubbing it a “people’s revolution” vowing to unseat Sisi.

Analysts assessing the fluid political situation believe that anger is swelling which would translate to more protests in the coming days.

“What happened on Friday is a worrying sign for the authorities. People went out to demonstrate even in the midst of a heavily securitised environment,” said political analyst Mustapha al-Sayyid.

“I believe these protests won’t stop at this point, but it’s also difficult predicting what comes next”, he added.

These are unprecedented times, and the role of media to tell and record the story of South Africa as it develops is more important than ever. But it comes at a cost. Advertisers are cancelling campaigns, and our live events have come to an abrupt halt. Our income has been slashed.

The Mail & Guardian is a proud news publisher with roots stretching back 35 years. We’ve survived thanks to the support of our readers, we will need you to help us get through this.

To help us ensure another 35 future years of fiercely independent journalism, please subscribe.

Agency
External source
Advertisting

‘Frustrated’ police resort to force

Regulation uncertainty leaves slap-happy police and soldiers to decide when people should or shouldn’t be allowed on the streets

Mail & Guardian needs your help

Our job is to help give you the information we all need to participate in building this country, while holding those in power to account. But now the power to help us keep doing that is in your hands

Press Releases

New energy mix on the cards

REI4P already has and will continue to yield thousands of employment opportunities

The online value of executive education in a Covid-19 world

Executive education courses further develop the skills of leaders in the workplace

Sisa Ntshona urges everyone to stay home, and consider travelling later

Sisa Ntshona has urged everyone to limit their movements in line with government’s request

SAB Zenzele’s special AGM postponed until further notice

An arrangement has been announced for shareholders and retailers to receive a 77.5% cash payout

20th Edition of the National Teaching Awards

Teachers are seldom recognised but they are indispensable to the country's education system

Awards affirm the vital work that teachers do

Government is committed to empowering South Africa’s teachers with skills, knowledge and techniques for a changing world

SAB Zenzele special AGM rescheduled to March 25 2020

New voting arrangements are being made to safeguard the health of shareholders