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My G-cup breasts just had to go

 

 

By grade four I was wearing two bras because my breasts were too big.

By the time I got to university, it had become unbearable. I was wearing a 34-G cup and could not play sport because running was too painful and no one was making sports bras that could fit me. I think the worst part was how my self-esteem was constantly low, with men making lewd comments and undressing me with their eyes when I walked past them.

I really didn’t want the attention.

I felt I needed to do something about it. So I started consulting doctors. Some did not want to do it, saying I was too young and what if my future boyfriends did not like the scarring of my breasts.

No one asked me what I wanted and needed.

Finally I found a doctor who agreed and luckily I was on medical aid that partially pays for breast reduction when there is a medical need. These breasts were affecting my physical body; my lower back was constantly in pain. But I did not have the R10 000 that I would have still needed.

I tried working part-time jobs while studying but could never raise enough money.

Then I moved to Jo’burg and was told about free surgery at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital. The procedure could be done for free but I had to lose weight first and be on the right side of the BMI [body mass index] scale. I lost about 11kgs but the back pain was unbearable. So I decided I needed to focus on myself, finish my degree, find a job and save up to get the breast reduction.

This year I got a job as an intern and though it’s not paying enough, I have been able to save to cover the co-payment on the medical aid.

On November 28, I got the operation done.

You have no idea how happy and excited I am about life now. People must be ready because I am going to embrace my body with all the scars that come with it. Now I can advocate for body positivity and enjoying the healthy body you have. — Nompilo Ntathu Zungu (24) as told to Athandiwe Saba

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Athandiwe Saba
Athandiwe Saba

Athandiwe Saba is a multi award-winning journalist who is passionate about data, human interest issues, governance and everything that isn’t on social media. She is an author, an avid reader and trying to find the answer to the perfect balance between investigative journalism, online audiences and the decline in newspaper sales. It’s a rough world and a rewarding profession.

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