Kingdom of Lesotho, Ministry of Health Request for Expression of Interest

Request for Expression of Interest (REOI) 

(Selection Method – Individual Consultant) 

Terms of Reference:  (Individual) Short Term Consultant

DEPARTMENTProject Implementing Unit
JOB TITLEGender mainstreaming Consultant
PROJECTLesotho Nutrition and Health System Strengthening Project (LNHSSP)
RESPONSIBLE TOProject Coordinator
DATE OF ISSUE27th February 2020
BID REF No.LS-MOH-152197-CS-INDV
  1. BACKGROUND 

The World Bank Group (or the “Bank” thereafter) works with its clients to support the promotion of gender equality through its projects and policy dialogue activities. The Bank’s Environmental and Social Policy (2017) covers both the environmental and social dimensions of sustainable development and includes gender equality as a key requirement while the Bank’s Gender Strategy (2016-2023) outlines how the Bank can promote gender equality and women’s empowerment in its countries where it operates, as an important contributor to reducing poverty and promoting shared prosperity. 

More specifically, the Bank seeks to narrow one or more gender gaps at the country level or in the sector related to the four pillars of its Gender Strategy: closing gaps in human endowments (education, health), employment and work, ownership of physical and financial assets, and agency and voice, especially related to reducing gender-based violence. The Bank expects its projects to develop a results chain by linking the gender analysis, actions, and indicators. The ‘Gender Tag’ is assigned to a project that integrates gender considerations in a clear results chain and demonstrates that the proposed intervention has a potential to contribute to reducing the gender gap/s. 

Besides proactive work to reduce gender gaps, the Bank is working to identify and mitigate adverse gender impacts of its projects. For example, there are well-founded concerns that projects involving major civil works can increase the risk of Gender-Based Violence (GBV), and in particular, Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (SEA). Projects often create a power differential between those who are engaged in civil works and the project-affected communities, which can increase the opportunities for the members of the project-affected communities to be sexually exploited and abused. These risks are particularly pronounced in large infrastructure projects including transport.  

  1. Introduction

The Government of Lesotho (GOL) is planning to implement the Lesotho Nutrition and Health System Strengthening Project (LNHSSP) with the International Development Association’s (IDA) financial and technical support.  The proposed IDA-financed project aims to support the GOL in implementing a multi-sectoral approach to improve health and nutrition outcomes over a five-year period. The GOL is seeking a consultant for a short-term assignment to support the LNHSSP in promoting gender equality and for preventing and mitigating adverse gender impacts of the project. Hence the PIU seeks to engage a short term consultant to develop guiding documents and conduct capacity building sessions to the stakeholders for this project. 

  1. Objective of the assignment

The consultant will ensure that all the activities are aligned with international Gender Based Violence (GBV) as well as Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (SEA) Risk Assessment and actions guidelines and standards and capacitate the LSNHSS project stakeholders in streamlining GBV and SEA during the implementation of this project.

  1. Duties and Responsibilities 

Under the supervision of the Project Coordinator, the Consultant will undertake the following activities:

  1. Prepare a comprehensive Gender Based Violence (GBV) as well as Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (SEA) Risk Assessment and Action Plan for the project, including outputs, activities, indicators and targets and monitoring mechanisms, to address the key recommendations identified through the assessment;
  2. The GBV and SEA Action Plan should include estimated costs for its implementation;
  3. The GBV and SEA Action Plan should be realistic and measurable, and focused on strengthening the project’s gender considerations;
  4. Develop guidance, resources and tools (supervision/ monitoring checklists, reporting templates, etc) to enable LNHSSP PIU staff and project partners to implement the GBV & SEA Action Plan as well as identify and address GBV and SEA risks during project implementation;
  5. Training and capacity building of the project team, partners and stakeholders on effective integration of Gender equality, GBV and SEA considerations into project activities;
  6. Prepare an Implementation Plan for mainstreaming of gender equality, GBV and SEA issues in all stages of the project; and
  7. Ensure that the Social Safeguards Specialist has the capacity to include the identification of gender gaps and reflect gender related project success and learning experience in Project Completion Reports.
  1. GENDER TAG:

Analysis 

  • Review the project documents and discuss it with the Task Team to understand their views on the challenges of reducing gender gap/s through this particular project and possible ways of structuring the interventions.
  • Review and draw from existing gender/social analysis that has already been done by the Bank (e.g. Country Partnership Framework and the Systematic Country Diagnostics) and others and/or that is being done as part of the project preparation (e.g. social assessments). Explore the country (and the region) Gender Action Plan.
  • As needed, travel to the project sites to meet the client and other stakeholders to understand their views on the challenges and opportunities to address gender gap/s through this project. This is important in order to develop realistic and implementable solution/s that are acceptable by the stakeholders.  
  • Ensure that the proposed solution/s address relevant gender gaps in the four pillars of the Gender Strategy: Endowments, Jobs, Assets, or Voice/Agency. Consider various demographic and socio-economic characteristics in the analysis and design of interventions, e.g. race, ethnicity, disability, sexual orientation, and gender identity together with income level, geographic location, and migratory status as they often lead to multiple overlapping layers of discrimination for women (and men). 
  1. GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE (GBV)

Identification of initial GBV risks for the project 

  • Identify the country, province/city data on prevalence, types and consequences of the GBV. This is to be able to assess project-related risks of GBV in the context of broader risk factors in the project location.
  • Assess potential risks of GBV, in particular, the risks of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (SEA) that the project may exacerbate. 
  • Travel to the country to meet the community organizations (e.g. women and child advocates, social workers, health teams, etc.) working with women, girls and boys and other at-risk groups to understand types of GBV that are present in the communities and that may be exacerbated by the project; understand what groups are most vulnerable to harm and how they currently deal with GBV incidences;
  • Inquire about existing channels of reporting GBV complaints and identify if these channels follow a survivor-centered approach.
  • Liaise with the project’s social safeguards team/gender specialist to ensure that the social assessment includes assessment of the underlying GBV risks and social situation; review and edit the ToR for social assessment, as needed.  
  • Support the team in filling in the GBV risk assessment tool to define the initial GBV risk assessment level for the project and to develop commensurate measures. 
  1. GBV service provider mapping 
  • Map GBV service providers available in the project-affected communities. Assess their capabilities to provide quality survivor-centered services. The assessment should seek the following questions: what services exist? Are they safe, accessible and adequately staffed? Are minimum standards of GBV service delivery met or is further capacity building required? Identify already existing directories of service providers to create a fuller picture of all relevant stakeholders on the ground.  
  • Identify all currently functioning channels available to lodge GBV complaints and whether they provide services that are confidential and free of risks of stigmatization and reprisal (e.g. staffed by suitably trained female staff; available for 24 hours; operators equipped with information on GBV service providers to make timely referrals to these services, as needed etc.). Identify how long they have been in service, the number of complaints received and their sources of funding. 
  • Identify all currently functioning shelters for the GBV survivors in the project area of influence and assess their quality, availability and accessibility; identify basic services they provide; their staffing; define their eligibility criteria for admission; identify how long they have been in service; number of residents being served; type of the facilities and their sources of funding. As with all other activities, collect only secondary data from the management of shelters so as not to increase distress to the survivors and to protect their privacy – in line with the ethical recommendations of the World Health Organization regarding research on violence against women. 
  • Pay special attention to health care providers since high quality, confidential and integrated healthcare service is a critical component of a multi-sector response to GBV. Map if and which healthcare providers provide quality health care that ensures implementation of the Minimum Initial Services Package for reproductive health (including post rape treatment supplies and other relevant clinical supplies). Also, assess if services are age-sensitive, e.g. for boys and for girls. Assess if health care providers offer services that are appropriate to male survivors of GBV. 
  • Assess if currently available GBV referral system, if any, is functional meeting the following key elements: at least one service provider for health, psychosocial, safety and protection and, as appropriate and feasible, legal and other support, in a given geographical area; services are delivered in a manner consistent with the GBV guiding principles; GBV service providers understand how and to whom to refer survivors for additional services; GBV service providers demonstrate a coordinated approach to case management, including confidential information sharing and participation in regular case management meetings to ensure that survivors have access to multi-sector services; GBV data collection, including standardized intake and referral forms, is undertaken in a safe and ethical manner; referral pathways identify all available services and are documented, disseminated and regularly updated, in a format that can be easily understood. 
  • Identify barriers to GBV survivors accessing multi-sector services: e.g. transport, language, literacy; fear of discrimination; knowledge of services, etc. Particularly focus on the barriers faced by minorities, e.g.  displaced women, women living in particularly difficult to reach areas, transgender, etc. Reflect these barriers into the design of the referral pathway and complaints channels. 
  1. GBV sensitization of the project stakeholders to the potential GBV risks
  • Deliver GBV training to the Project Implementing agencies (IAs), explain what GBV and particularly SEA risks in the project are and how the project can exacerbate those risks. The GBV sensitization of stakeholders may be requested for both the existing portfolio (for GBV retrofitting) and pipeline projects. Discuss the training scope and the content with the project’s Gender Specialist prior to developing the training material and delivering the trainings. 
  • Review the IA’s capacity to prevent and respond to GBV risks identified during the safeguards preparation.
  1. Qualification and Experience
  1. Master’s degree in Gender Studies or Development Studies or Sociology and Social development Sciences;
  2. At least 10 years’ professional experience in gender, GBV and SEA analysis, research, advocacy skills, mainstreaming and responsive programming environment, preferably with international organizations or in international development settings. Familiarity with the World Bank Group will be an advantage. 
  3. In depth knowledge of gender issues affecting rural and urban communities in developing countries (indicate any publications or documents developed for developing countries);
  4. At least 10 years’ experience in designing and implementing training and capacity building tools on gender, GBV, SEA mainstreaming and analysis;
  5. Experience in conducting gender impact assessment and/or designing/ implementing gender and development project;
  6. Conducting Gender Based Violence/Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (GBV/SEA Risk Assessment and Action Plan;
  7. Experience in applying world Bank Environment and Social Standards regarding this area will be an added advantage
  8.  Key Skills
  1. Ability to work independently and be creative and innovative; integrity and ability to work in a team;
  2. Good listener with demonstrated ability to present and win support for ideas as well as make effective and timely decisions;
  3. Good mastery of standard computer applications: Microsoft Office Package;
  4. Excellent written and verbal communication skills in English;
  5. Must be result focused and be able to work under pressure and tight deadlines.
  6. Outputs/Deliverables

The Consultant is responsible for delivering of the following outputs:

No.DeliverablesTentative TimeframePercentage of Output
1.Inception Report, including the proposed methodology and work plan for delivering the assignment.2 weeks after Contract signing.10%
2.Gender equality issues including Gender Based Violence (GBV) as well as Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (SEA) Risk Assessment and Costed Action Plan for the project, including outputs, activities, indicators and targets and monitoring mechanisms, to address the key recommendations identified through assessment;Month 3 of the Contract35%
3.Guidance, Resources and Tools Report to enable LNHSSP staff and project partners to Implement the GBV & SEA Action Plan and also identify and address GBV and SEA risks during project implementation.Month 4 of the Contract15%
4.Implementation Plan for mainstreaming of GBV and SEA issues in all stages of the project.Month 5 of the Contract15%
5.Development and delivery of training and capacity building of the project team and partners on effective integration of GBV and SEA considerations into project activities.Month 5 of the Contract 20%
6.Close out Report on all the deliverables handed to the project CoordinatorEnd of Month 6 of the Contract5%

TOTAL6 Months100%
  1. DELIVERABLES

• Results chain for the Gender tag (2-3pp).

• GBV/SEA risk assessment (2-5pp)

• GBV service provider mapping (2-5pp)

• Sensitization of the IA of the GBV risks.  

  1. Format of Deliverables

Deliverables shall be presented in both hard and soft copy. All documents shall be in English. All reports shall be bound. Maps and schematics included in reports must be a minimum of A3 size, however if the detail is unclear at this size A2 or A1 copies may be required. Soft copies of reports and other information required shall be in Word, Excel, MS-Project, Arc-GIS 10 with linked shape files. The consultant shall propose other software to be used in the preparation of the Action Plans for approval. 

  1. Management Arrangements

The consultant will be reporting directly to the Project Coordinator, who will manage, supervise and guide the work plan.

The Project Coordinator will put at the disposal of the selected Consultant all available materials, and necessary information for tasks achievements as needed. During the assignment the Consultant will use the Office facilities of the Ministry of Health e.g. Office space, internet access, printing, copying.

  1. Duration

The assignment shall be completed within 6 Months of Contract signing.

  1. Duty Station

The duty station shall be the Ministry of Health Head Office, Maseru, with frequent field visits to project sites.

  1. Consultant Responsibilities
  2. The Consultant shall be solely responsible for analysis and interpretation of data, reports, review, etc., for the purpose of this assignment and for the findings, conclusions and recommendations in all requested Deliverables;
  1. The Consultant will be responsible for own residential expenses. The Consultant is expected to use his/her own computer and cell phone. The work plan should also make allowance for the time and travel required for interaction with all the stakeholders;
  1. The Consultant will make all travel, meeting and other necessary arrangements for the assignment;
  1. Conduct of the Consultant:
  • The Consultant will be expected to carry out this assignment in an open and transparent manner, with the highest degree of professionalism and integrity;
  • The Consultant will not, under any circumstances, take any action or be seen to be taking any actions, which may hinder or prevent the progress of the project;
  1. Travel

All envisaged travel costs must be included in the Financial Proposal. This includes travel to join duty station as well as site visits and travel costs exceeding those of an economy class ticket will not be accepted. Should the Consultant wish to travel on a higher class he/she should do so using their own resources.

  1. Lump Sum Amount

The price for the financial proposal should indicate a “Lump Sum Amount” for all costs including professional fees, living allowance and communication. The consumables during field related missions, travel, etc. that could possibly be incurred by the Consultant needs to be factored should be included as “Re-imbursables” into the proposed price.

  1. Payment

Payments for this Consultancy will be based on the achievement of each deliverable and certification that each has been satisfactorily completed as per the percentage of the output provided above. Payments will not be based on the number of days worked but on the completion of each stated deliverable within indicated timeframes.

  1. Submissions
  1. Attention of interested Consultants is drawn to paragraph 1.9 of the World Bank’s Guidelines: Selection and Employment of Consultants by World Bank Borrowers, January 2011 (revised July 2014). (“Consultant Guidelines”), setting forth the World Bank’s policy on conflict of interest.  
  1. All applications should be in English and must be properly filled in and be courier with the subject “Expression of Interest for “Gender mainstreaming Consultant” or hand delivered to the below address.
  1. Expressions of interest must be delivered in a written and hard Copy form to the address below in person or send via email below, on or before 19th March, 2020 1200 hour Local time.

Attn: M Moeketsi-Procurement Specialist and copy Procurement Manager

Procurement Unit, Ground Floor, Ministry Of Health Headquarters ,Corner Constitution Road & Linare Road P. O. Box 514, Maseru 100, Lesotho, Tel:(+266) 27323277 or email. [email protected]

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