Africa

Thousands flee Congo Ninjas

Vindza and Kimba, two cities in the heart of Congo's Pool region, have become virtual ghost towns in recent months, as residents flee to the forest to escape fighting between government troops and rebels.

Zimbabwe’s economy heads for meltdown

Restaurant customers in Zimbabwe pay with thick wads of local currency bulging in their bags and pockets. Real estate buyers hand over deposits of millions of Zimbabwean dollars stuffed into suitcases and car trunks.

Carriers fight for a slice of the African sky

Several foreign and local companies are fighting for a slice of the African skies, which only account for about 2,5% of the global air traffic and witnessed an ''annus horribilis'' in 2001.

EU sparkles across sea for clandestine Africans

Hundreds of pairs of eyes stare out from the northernmost point in Africa across a thin stretch of deadly choppy water.

Launching Nepad: devil is in the detail

Details of a mechanism to compel African states to practise good governance would still take some time to be finalised.

Low turn-out marks 2nd round elections in Mali

The impoverished African nation of Mali voted in the second round of parliamentary elections on Sunday, but with most people ignoring calls to vote and leaving polling stations largely deserted.

Press freedom? In Zimbabwe?

POLICE arrested and charged a columnist for Zimbabwe's only independent daily newspaper on Monday, bringing to eight the number of journalists arrested under harsh new media laws.

Kasbah crumbles, and with it, the heart of Algiers

Centuries of history in the ancient Algiers kasbah are falling away, literally. Once a sparkling white medina, or Islamic city, perched on a hill above a glistening waterfront, the kasbah has become an overcrowded home with unsteady walls.

Peer system won’t be tested on Zimbabwe… yet

It is too early to use Zimbabwe as a test case for the peer review mechanism proposed in the New Partnership for Africa's Development.

Lesotho poll free, but not fair, says opposition

Lesotho's ruling party is headed for an overwhelming win in parliamentary elections, but the main opposition party has rejected the preliminary results.

UN reveals the ‘hard facts’ about Africa’s future

Rapid population growth, wars and high levels of national debt, disasters and disease have all taken their toll on the people and the rich natural environment of Africa over the past thirty years.

Rwanda heals wounds of genocide

Survivors of Rwanda's 1994 genocide and relatives of those jailed for their alleged role in the massacres hope that this week's revival of traditional village courts will help ease the pain.

Ivory Coast rebels as self-styled policemen

When a resident of rebel-held Bouake in Ivory Coast rings the headquarters of the mutineers who seized control here in September to complain that he was robbed, they react fast.

Robert Mugabe… Joseph Stalin

Nobel laureate and Northern Ireland politician David Trimble drew parallels on Thursday between the Soviet Union under Joseph Stalin in the 1930s and Zimbabwe under President Robert Mugabe.

Swazis love their king, says Mswati

Swaziland's king has defended a custom enabling him to take as many brides as he likes and said a woman who asked the courts to prevent him from marrying her daughter had been badly advised.

Egyptologists hit bureaucratic brick wall

Two accomplished but amateur Egyptologists have run into a bureaucratic brick wall in their search for what they suspect might be a hidden corridor in the Pyramid of Cheops.

Uncut: shock film exposes genital mutilation

''A woman who is not circumcised is a dog and in the olden days was a slave,'' declares Stella Omorogie, a well-known Nigerian traditional female circumciser.

Corruption hastens famine in Malawi

A major report published by the International Bar Association exposes how threats to freedom and justice have triggered off a chain reaction putting millions of people in Malawi under threat of famine.
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