Nando's not chickening out over 'Julius' ad

Fans of Nando’s can look forward to new humorous TV adverts while tucking into their chicken wings on Saturday night, it emerged on Friday.

Nando’s agreed during a meeting with the African National Congress Youth League (ANCYL) on Thursday to can its television and radio adverts featuring a puppet named Julius.

They agreed “to resolve the disagreement, by disassociating the ANCYL brand Julius Malema in the current Nando’s television campaign”, the company said in a statement.

Nando’s national marketing manager Sylvester Chauke said the brand would take into consideration and address all the allegations from the ANCYL while still retaining the Nando’s edge and personality.

The meeting was a “true mzansi” meeting with high spirits and humour along the way.

“We are pleased that the ANCYL sees the humour in the advertising, however, understand their sensitivity around using their leader, Julius,” Chauke said.

Senior brand manager Lara Easthorpe said the advert was not aimed at poking fun at Malema, but rather about providing a lightheartedness during this serious time of elections.

Chauke said the campaign was all about bringing a fun element to the elections. “We have done that and are happy with the energy it has created”.

“But Nando’s is not chickening out. Stay tuned to your TV screens tomorrow night for more.”

The ANCYL said in a statement it had expressed its concern over the adverts and requested Nando’s to promptly withdraw them.

“Nando’s will continue to properly advertise their products in a suitable manner, and disassociate the ANCYL and its president Julius Malema from their advertisements,” it said.

The brief statement concluded that the league “strongly believes in freedom of expression and creativity which respects other people and organisations”.—Sapa

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