Get more Mail & Guardian
Subscribe or Login

Jack Parow: Meet the Afrikaans ‘Eminem’

The Mail & Guardian caught up with Jack Parow, the ‘Afrikaans Eminem’.

How was Jack Parow born?
Jack Parow was born in the Spur at the Sanlam Centre (now known as the Parow Centre for obvious reasons). He started as an alter ego, but quickly took over control of my body and now I am Jack Parow. About nine years ago I started doing my ruff train track raps and evolved into what I am today.

The Voëlvry movement was inspired by apartheid politics. Then came the more introspective rock ‘n roll era. The current Afrikaans music scene is more about fun, is it not?
Ja, I just think that we get bombarded with so much stuff like politics every day that I don’t think when we go out we want to hear more about it. I touch on some stuff, but mostly I just want everyone to have a good time and make them laugh and party HARD. You know, it’s lekker!

Is the emergence of artists like you, Die Antwoord and Gazelle a sign that Afrikaners are ready to party?
Yes, I hope so! We have always partied hard, but now we are going to party even fucking harder.

Die Antwoord and Jack Parow present a zef image — common, poor and drunk. Are you ripping off that part of society or are you making a statement?
Well, the zef image is me, it’s how I grew up and how I have been classified my entire life, being from behind the boerewors curtain. So, yes, I am making a statement to say that we aren’t as bad as everyone makes us out to be. But at the same time I’m also ripping off my friends and myself because we are pretty dysfunctional and rough as fuck.

Do you have a message?
Yes — party as hard as you can and get as drunk as you can before it’s too late.

You have been called the Afrikaans Eminem. How do you feel about that?
Eminem is really cool and stuff, so if I’m like him I’m happy. But a white person that raps is always the “something Eminem”, like the Australian Eminem or the German Eminem. That’s just how it is.

Does Jack Parow date English girls?
Yes, I date them all. English, Afrikaans, Indian or mute. I schmaak them all.

Jack Parow will be in Stellenbosch on March 3 and 4 and at the Ramfest in Johannesburg on Saturday March 6

Subscribe for R500/year

Thanks for enjoying the Mail & Guardian, we’re proud of our 36 year history, throughout which we have delivered to readers the most important, unbiased stories in South Africa. Good journalism costs, though, and right from our very first edition we’ve relied on reader subscriptions to protect our independence.

Digital subscribers get access to all of our award-winning journalism, including premium features, as well as exclusive events, newsletters, webinars and the cryptic crossword. Click here to find out how to join them and get a 57% discount in your first year.

Related stories

WELCOME TO YOUR M&G

If you’re reading this, you clearly have great taste

If you haven’t already, you can subscribe to the Mail & Guardian for less than the cost of a cup of coffee a week, and get more great reads.

Already a subscriber? Sign in here

Advertising

Subscribers only

Coko vs S ruling: The case against a subjective test...

Acting judge Tembeka Ngcukaitobi’s acquittal of a rape suspect has raised controversy, but legal experts say the fault lay with legislators and not the court

DA’s egregious sexual harassment case finally begins

The party is accused of protecting a councillor, who’s also implicated in R1.2m graft

More top stories

Lucas Radebe: ‘My football career began behind my parents’ back’

Soccer legend Lucas ‘Rhoo’ Radebe is a busy man, but he made time in his hectic schedule to speak to Ntombizodwa Makhoba about his fondest childhood memories, how his soccer career began, and, as a father of eight, his legacy

Coko vs S ruling: The case against a subjective test...

Acting judge Tembeka Ngcukaitobi’s acquittal of a rape suspect has raised controversy, but legal experts say the fault lay with legislators and not the court

Defend journalists and media freedom in Eswatini

Journalists are censored through cruel and illegitimate detention, torture and the removal of means to disseminate information to citizens crying – and dying – for it

It’s safe to open the beaches, says UPL after chemical...

Agrochemical producer UPL said it has paid R250-million in chemical spill clean-up
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…
×