BA, Iberia sign merger deal to create global giant

British Airways (BA) and Spanish flag carrier Iberia on Thursday announced a merger deal to create one of the world’s biggest airlines to compete more effectively in the fast-consolidating aviation sector.

The tie-up would create Europe’s second-biggest airline by market capitalisation after Lufthansa, combining Iberia’s strong position in Latin America with BA’s presence in Africa, Asia and North America.

“British Airways and Iberia have today [Thursday] taken a further step towards creating a new leading European airline group by signing their merger agreement,” the two loss-making airlines said in a joint statement.

“The new company will be one of the world’s largest airline groups with 408 aircraft flying to 200 destinations and carrying more than 58-million passengers per year.

“It has been structured so that it can take advantage of further consolidation in the global aviation industry,” they said, adding that it would benefit both airlines’ customers, employees and shareholders.


The landmark deal would create annual savings of about €400-million by the fifth year of the deal.

The tie-up, which requires regulatory and shareholder approvals, is expected to be completed by late 2010 and follows a preliminary accord in November.

“The merged company will provide customers with a larger combined network,” said BA chief executive Willie Walsh.

“It will also have greater potential for further growth by optimising the dual hubs of London and Madrid and provide combined investment in new products and services.”

Iberia chairperson Antonio Vasquez also hailed the deal as a major step forward, as both airlines seek to avoid being sidelined by rivals Air France-KLM and Lufthansa.

“This is an important step in the process towards creating one of the world’s leading global airlines that will be better equipped to compete with other major airlines and participate in future industry consolidation,” Vasquez said.

Steep cost-cutting
Under the agreement, BA and Iberia will be grouped under a new holding company, known as International Airlines Group, which will be quoted on stock exchanges in London and Madrid.

However, both airlines will retain their current operations and individual brands.

Iberia will keep the right to terminate the merger deal if BA’s pension-recovery plan is deemed to be “materially detrimental to the economic premises of the merger”.

The BA-Iberia merger comes as the global downturn and the rise of low-cost airlines drives airline alliances and steep cost-cutting.

Both groups have suffered steep losses as the global recession slammed the brakes on demand for air travel.

At the same time, BA has faced industrial action from cabin crew over its cost-cutting plans that are aimed at stemming losses.

The pair had signed a preliminary deal last November after lengthy negotiations — but Iberia said at the time it would back out of the agreement if BA’s giant pension-deficit problem was not resolved.

Under the initial agreement set out in November, BA will own 56% of the new company while Iberia will hold 44%. Walsh would retain his position as chief executive, while Iberia would secure the chairmanship.

In addition, the new company would be headquartered in Madrid, but its operational base would be in London.

Rival groups had reacted in anger to the deal, with Ryanair comparing the merger to “two drunks trying to prop each other up”.

Virgin Atlantic, meanwhile, had argued that it will increase BA’s dominance at London’s Heathrow airport.

News of the BA-Iberia merger comes after US media reported late on Tuesday that United Airlines and US Airways were in merger talks that could lead to the creation of one of the world’s largest airlines. — AFP

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