Get more Mail & Guardian
Subscribe or Login

Police arrest Sunday Times journalist

A Sunday Times journalist was arrested for fraud and defeating the ends of justice on Wednesday.

Hawks spokesperson Musa Zondi confirmed the journalist had been arrested and would appear in court within 48 hours.

Zondi would not name the journalist or give further details of the alleged offence.

“You’ll get to hear the case when he appears in court,” he said.

Times Live has identified the journalist as Mzilikazi wa Afrika.

Times Live reported that Wa Afrika was arrested for the possession of what police claim is a fraudulent letter of resignation from Mpumalanga Premier David Mabuza to President Jacob Zuma.

“Wa Afrika was seized by police, who became involved in a screaming match with senior editors about whether photographers could take pictures or not,” reported Times Live.

Wa Afrika recently published an article that alleged that police commissioner General Bheki Cele had improperly purchased a new building for police headquarters at a cost of R500-million.

‘Deeply concerned’
In a statement posted on the Times Live site, Sunday Times editor Ray Hartley said the paper was trying to get clarity on the charges, and find out where Wa Afrika was being held.

“I am deeply concerned at the fact that a journalist can be arrested and held at an undisclosed location in a country where the rule of law ought to apply,” read the statement.

“He was arrested by a large number of policemen in an operation which was clearly designed to intimidate, and I can only conclude that this was the true motive for what took place today [Wednesday].

“Mzilikazi was one of the authors of the story which we published on Sunday about the rental of new police headquarters at the cost of R500m without following the usual tender proceedings. I hope, for the sake of our country, that he was not arrested on spurious charges in order to punish him for what he wrote.”

Subscribe for R500/year

Thanks for enjoying the Mail & Guardian, we’re proud of our 36 year history, throughout which we have delivered to readers the most important, unbiased stories in South Africa. Good journalism costs, though, and right from our very first edition we’ve relied on reader subscriptions to protect our independence.

Digital subscribers get access to all of our award-winning journalism, including premium features, as well as exclusive events, newsletters, webinars and the cryptic crossword. Click here to find out how to join them and get a 57% discount in your first year.

Sapa Afp
Guest Author

Related stories

WELCOME TO YOUR M&G

If you’re reading this, you clearly have great taste

If you haven’t already, you can subscribe to the Mail & Guardian for less than the cost of a cup of coffee a week, and get more great reads.

Already a subscriber? Sign in here

Advertising

Subscribers only

Mabuza’s Russian jaunts and the slippery consequences of medical tourism

For more than five years the deputy president has remained steadfast in his right to travel abroad to receive medical treatment

Zondo commission: 10 unanswered questions

Zuma went to jail rather than testify. Some who did told blatant lies. Who decided Cabinet appointments and how much money was carried out of Saxonwold?

More top stories

Ugandan teachers turn to coffin-making after schools close

The Covid-19 pandemic resulted in the country’s schools closing and teachers being left without jobs

Mabuza’s Russian jaunts and the slippery consequences of medical tourism

For more than five years the deputy president has remained steadfast in his right to travel abroad to receive medical treatment

A new book asks the timeless question: ‘Can We Be...

Ziyanda Stuurman’s new book critiques the South African police and their role in society

‘These people are barbarians’: Police torture in Southern Africa

In Botswana, South Africa and Zimbabwe torture is used to extract information, elicit confessions, punish or sometimes for sadistic reasons
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…
×