Obama rescues the Grand Canyon

Barack Obama took a big step towards preserving one of the world’s natural wonders on Monday, banning uranium mining on 400 000 hectares of land around the Grand Canyon.

The move, announced by the interior secretary, Ken Salazar, at a film screening in Washington DC, bans new mining claims around the canyon for the next 20 years. The area is rich in uranium deposits.

“A withdrawal is the right approach for this priceless American landscape,” Salazar said. “People from all over the country and around the world come to visit the Grand Canyon. Numerous American Indian tribes regard this magnificent icon as a sacred place and millions of people in the Colorado river basin depend on the river.”

Environmental groups said the move, which was opposed by the mining industry and some Republicans, would secure the American president’s environmental legacy.

The measure does not affect about 3 200 existing mining claims around the canyon, however. The administration said there would be continued development of 11 uranium mines.

Conservation groups said Obama had shown political courage in going ahead with the ban in the face of opposition. “Despite significant pressure, the president did not settle for a halfway measure,” said Jane Danowitz of the Pew Environment Group. In the final years of the George Bush presidency, when uranium prices were rising worldwide, mining companies filed thousands of claims in northern Arizona on lands near the Grand Canyon.

They also proposed reopening old mines adjacent to the canyon.

Salazar ordered a temporary halt to claims in 2009 after Obama came to office. Government officials proposed the 20-year ban in October last year, after an environmental review calling for the preservation of an “iconic landscape”.

“It is appropriate to pause, identify what the predicted level of mining and its impacts on the Grand Canyon would be and decide what level of risk is acceptable to take with this natural treasure,” Bob Abbey, the director of the Bureau of Land Management, said at the time.

Republicans condemn the withdrawal of lands
Republicans, including the former presidential candidate John McCain, condemned the move to withdraw lands from mining claims as an emotional overreaction.

“This withdrawal is fuelled by an emotional public relations campaign designed by some of the same environmental groups whose long-time mission has been to kill mining and grazing jobs on the Arizona Strip, as well as tourism jobs at the Grand Canyon,” McCain told a hearing in Congress last year.

But Gene Karpinski, president of the League of Conservation Voters, argued this week that it made much more economic sense to protect the tourism industry that depended on the canyon.

“Extending the current moratorium on uranium-mining claims will protect tourism-related jobs, drinking water for millions downstream and critical wildlife habitat,” said Karpinski.

Conservation groups have long argued that mining laws in the West are antiquated, giving companies free access to vast swaths of public lands. In the case of the Grand Canyon, the concerns go far beyond just conserving a spectacular view.

At least one creek in the national park is known to be contaminated by uranium and the government’s environmental impact review found high levels of arsenic from old uranium operations and contamination of the Colorado river. —

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