NPA probes Ravalomanana for crimes against humanity

The National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) is investigating former Madagascan president Marc Ravalomanana for alleged crimes against humanity, according to a report on Sunday.

The NPA confirmed on Saturday that initial material it had obtained suggested a "reasonable evidence" that crimes against humanity had alleged occurred, the Sunday Times reported.

Ravalomanana fled to South Africa in 2009, after weeks of tension in Madagascar, exacerbated by his guards opening fire on peaceful protesters. About 40 people were killed.

NPA official Bulelwa Makeke said: "I can confirm that the process of collecting evidence is under way and discussions with the directorate of priority crime investigation have been held."

This came after a Malagasy group, called the Association of Martyrs of Antananarivo Merina Square, laid a complaint with the NPA through a South African attorney four month ago.


The association submitted a dossier including affidavits by alleged victims, video footage and international reports on what had happened in Madagascar before Ravalomanana was toppled.

Makeke said the final decision on whether to prosecute rested with the national director of public prosecutions.

Date set for elections

Meanwhile, Madagascar's election commission said last week the island nation planned to hold its presidential election next year on May 8.

Election commission president Beatrice Attalah said that the country would hold a run-off on July 3 2013, as well as elections for the National Assembly the same day. Attalah said elections for municipal posts will be held October 23 2013.

Ravalomanana remains unable to return home. Rival Andry Rajoelina toppled Ravalomanana in 2009 and now leads a unity government charged with preparing for next year's elections.

Ravalomanana and Rajoelina held talks recently in the Seychelles about allowing the exiled president to return. However, officials in Madagascar deported Ravalomanana's wife to Thailand when she recently flew into the country with a relative.

These are unprecedented times, and the role of media to tell and record the story of South Africa as it develops is more important than ever. But it comes at a cost. Advertisers are cancelling campaigns, and our live events have come to an abrupt halt. Our income has been slashed.

The Mail & Guardian is a proud news publisher with roots stretching back 35 years. We’ve survived thanks to the support of our readers, we will need you to help us get through this.

To help us ensure another 35 future years of fiercely independent journalism, please subscribe.

Sapa Ap
Guest Author
Advertising

Municipality won’t remove former mayor, despite home affairs demands

The department is fighting with a small Free State town, which it accuses of continuing to employ an illegal immigrant

Western Cape Premier Alan Winde tests positive for coronavirus

Alan Winde admits he is in a vulnerable group when it comes to contracting the virus, considering he is 55 years old, and a diabetic

New August 31 deadline for the last learners to return...

In an amendment published in the Government Gazette on Tuesday, the basic education minister has made further changes to the school return dates for different grades

Eskom refers employees suspected of contracts graft for criminal investigations

The struggling power utility has updated Parliament on investigations into contracts where more than R4-billion was lost in overpayments
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…

The best local and international journalism

handpicked and in your inbox every weekday