Proteas bowled out for 287

South Africa were bowled out for 287 in their first innings against Australia on day three of the third Test at Newlands, in Cape Town, on Monday.

Australia, as a result, led by 207 runs going into the second innings and did not enforce the follow-on.

Mitchell Johnson was again chief destroyer for Australia with figures of 4/42.

Faf du Plessis marched to the middle with South Africa on 121 for four, and attempted to steady the innings. Two more wickets fell around him, that of AB de Villiers (14) and JP Duminy (4), before he was joined by Vernon Philander.

Together Du Plessis and Philander put on 95 runs for the seventh wicket, before Australia made the breakthrough.


Johnson found the edge of Du Plessis, caught by David Warner at gully for 67.

Strong resistance
Dale Steyn put up strong resistance with a knock of 28 before he became Johnson's fourth victim, with Philander ending the innings unbeaten on 37. 

In the morning session, South Africa lost four wickets after Australia had declared on their overnight score of 494/7.

Graeme Smith's poor run of form in the series continued as he departed for five, edging Ryan Harris through to wicketkeeper Brad Haddin.

South Africa soon found themselves further in the mire at 42/2 when Dean Elgar (11) was caught behind off James Pattinson.

Alviro Petersen and Hashim Amla staged a mini recovery sharing a third-wicket stand of 53 runs.

Petersen (53) was next to go when he gloved a Johnson delivery down the leg side, giving Haddin his third catch of the morning. Harris then got the ball to jag back in to clean bowl Amla for 38. – Sapa

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