Jazz saxophone player Ornette Coleman dies at 85

Ornette Coleman, a self-taught alto saxophone player who polarised the jazz world with his unconventional “free jazz” before coming to be regarded as an avant garde genius, died on Thursday morning in New York at the age of 85, according to the New York Times. A representative for the family said the cause of death was cardiac arrest.

Coleman’s 1959 album The Shape of Jazz to Come is considered one of the most groundbreaking in the genre’s history. His death was confirmed to AFP by his publicist, Ken Weinstein. Coleman was born and raised in Texas but died in New York, where he spent much of his career.

According to the Guardian on Thursday, Coleman brought a new vocabulary to jazz, in the widest terms: melody, instrumentation, technique were all taken in new directions in his music. He received the Pulitzer Prize for music in 2007 for his album Sound Grammar. – Reuters; AFP

Subscribe to the M&G

These are unprecedented times, and the role of media to tell and record the story of South Africa as it develops is more important than ever.

The Mail & Guardian is a proud news publisher with roots stretching back 35 years, and we’ve survived right from day one thanks to the support of readers who value fiercely independent journalism that is beholden to no-one. To help us continue for another 35 future years with the same proud values, please consider taking out a subscription.


Reuters
Guest Author

Related stories

Why no vaccine at all is better than a botched vaccine

As Covid vaccines near the manufacturing stage, a look at two polio vaccines provides valuable historical insights

Under cover of Covid, Uganda targets LGBTQ+ shelter

Pandemic rules were used to justify a violent raid on a homeless shelter in Uganda, but a group of victims is pursuing a criminal case against the perpetrators

Western Cape SMBs look to technology to get them through pandemic

Many companies have over-capitalised on IT infrastructure in the past, and are looking for ways to access simpler, cheaper technology that cuts their costs

See people as individual humans, not as a race

We need to ingrain values of equality in education, businesses, society broadly and religious groups to see people

JJ Rawlings left an indelible mark on Ghana’s history

The air force pilot and former president used extreme measures, including a coup, enforced ‘discipline’ through executions, ‘disappearances’ and floggings, but reintroduced democracy

Sudan’s government gambles over fuel-subsidy cuts — and people pay the price

Economists question the manner in which the transitional government partially cut fuel subsidies
Advertising

Subscribers only

Covid-19 surges in the Eastern Cape

With people queuing for services, no water, lax enforcement of mask rules and plenty of partying, the virus is flourishing once again, and a quarter of the growth is in the Eastern Cape

Ace prepares ANC branches for battle

ANC secretary general Ace Magashule is ignoring party policy on corruption-charged officials and taking his battle to branch level, where his ‘slate capture’ strategy is expected to leave Ramaphosa on the ropes

More top stories

Why no vaccine at all is better than a botched...

As Covid vaccines near the manufacturing stage, a look at two polio vaccines provides valuable historical insights

Under cover of Covid, Uganda targets LGBTQ+ shelter

Pandemic rules were used to justify a violent raid on a homeless shelter in Uganda, but a group of victims is pursuing a criminal case against the perpetrators

JJ Rawlings left an indelible mark on Ghana’s history

The air force pilot and former president used extreme measures, including a coup, enforced ‘discipline’ through executions, ‘disappearances’ and floggings, but reintroduced democracy

Sudan’s government gambles over fuel-subsidy cuts — and people pay...

Economists question the manner in which the transitional government partially cut fuel subsidies
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…