Zuma makes NPA representations at the eleventh hour

President Jacob Zuma submitted his representations stating why he should not face prosecution for the now infamous 2009 spy types saga to the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) late on Wednesday evening. 

The representations were initially supposed to be submitted in November 2017, but National Director of Public Prosecutions Shaun Abrahams extended the deadline to January 31, 2018.

NPA spokesperson Luvuyo Mfaku has confirmed that the president’s legal representatives submitted his representations at 21:00 at the NPA offices.

A Supreme Court of Appeal (SCA) ruling dismissed Zuma’s and the NPA’s application to appeal a high court ruling that the dropping of the corruption charges against him by then NPA boss Mkotedi Mpshe was “irrational”.

Mpshe dropped the charges, based on the so-called “Spy Tapes”, which were presented to him by Zuma’s legal team.


The tapes were made up of recordings of telephone conversations between then Scorpions boss Leonard McCarthy and former NPA boss Bulelani Ngcuka which Zuma’s legal team claimed showed political interference in the decision to charge the now president of South Africa.

On Wednesday, the DA released a statement saying it had written to Abrahams asking to be provided with a copy of Zuma’s submissions.

“The DA is entitled to Zuma’s full submission as the main litigant in this case, which has dragged on for almost a decade, costing ordinary South Africans an estimated R30-million or more in legal fees,” said James Selfe, chairperson of the DA federal council.

The party said it would engage thoroughly with the content and continue to ensure that Zuma has his day in court.

“For too long Zuma has evaded his day in court. Any other citizen would have had to answer to such charges in court, yet Zuma has been given special treatment and been allowed to make fresh representations on the same charges he faced in 2009,” said Selfe.—News24

Subscribe to the M&G

These are unprecedented times, and the role of media to tell and record the story of South Africa as it develops is more important than ever.

The Mail & Guardian is a proud news publisher with roots stretching back 35 years, and we’ve survived right from day one thanks to the support of readers who value fiercely independent journalism that is beholden to no-one. To help us continue for another 35 future years with the same proud values, please consider taking out a subscription.

Matshidiso Madia
Tshidi Madia
Love & Light•Journalist•decided to call myself a lover of things cause you know.

Related stories

Why crooks are shivering in their boots

Ace Magashule’s anxiety has to do with the array of arrests of high-profile people facing fraud and corruption charges

How graft arrests came together

Learning from its failure to turn the Schabir Shaik conviction into one for Jacob Zuma, the state is now building an effective system for catching thieves. Khaya Koko, Sabelo Skiti and Paddy Harper take a look behind the scenes at how law enforcement agencies have started creating consequences for the corrupt

More arrests expected in the R2.3bn VBS heist

Prosecutors tell the court that more people will be charged and additional charges will be added to the seven accused in a new charge sheet

Richard Calland: South Africa needs a Roosevelt style of leadership

President Cyril Ramaphosa needs to hold ‘fireside chats’ and have more power and institutional muscle around him, writes Richard Calland

This beef smells like manure

What’s that animal sound? Is it a Hawk swooping? A chicken roosting? No, it’s Zuma remembering a beef

Editorial: Arrests expose the rot in the ANC

The ANC has used its power to create networks of patronage. And this means going after corruption will cost the party financially
Advertising

Subscribers only

SAA bailout raises more questions

As the government continues to grapple with the troubles facing the airline, it would do well to keep on eye on the impending Denel implosion

ANC’s rogue deployees revealed

Despite 6 300 ANC cadres working in government, the party’s integrity committee has done little to deal with its accused members

More top stories

Fake trafficking news targets migrants

Exaggerated reports on social media of human trafficking syndicates snatching people in broad daylight legitimate xenophobia while deflecting from the real problems in society

It’s not a ‘second wave’: Covid resurges because safety measures...

A simple model shows how complacency in South Africa will cause the number of infections to go on an upward trend again

Unisa shortlists two candidates for the vice-chancellor job

The outgoing vice-chancellor’s term has been extended to April to allow for a smooth hand-over

How US foreign policy under Donald Trump has affected Africa

Lesotho has been used as a microcosm in this article to reflect how the foreign policy has affected Africa
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…

The best local and international journalism

handpicked and in your inbox every weekday