Bus services expected to resume tomorrow

The national bus strike is settled — via another compromise.

The sticking point that delayed a settlement was the insistence by the unions that the agreed 9% pay rise be backdated to the scheduled start date of April 1.

Employers insisted on the increase only being paid from the time the latest deal was signed.

Now it seems ― and an announcement is expected later on Monday ― that the employers have agreed to backpay from April 1 to April 17, when the strike began. However, the payment will be on the basic wage.

All parties have apparently signed, with unions now informing their members that the strike is over and employers agreeing to lift their lock-outs.


Services should resume tomorrow.

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