Bonginkosi Khanyile guilty of public violence, court finds

The trial has taken over two years owing to several postponements. (Rogan Ward)

The trial has taken over two years owing to several postponements. (Rogan Ward)

Fees Must Fall activist Bonginkosi Khanyile has been found guilty of public violence, failing to comply with police instruction and possession of a dangerous weapon.

On Monday, Khanyile appeared in the Durban regional court where he made admissions in terms of four of the 13 charges against him.

Khanyile was acquitted of the nine other charges at the outset of his trial.

During the trial, Khanyile’s lawyer Danie Combrink‚ said Khanyile had “used a slingshot to stone police and ignored their pleas to disperse,” Timeslive reported.

The slingshot was reportedly later deemed to be a “dangerous weapon”.

“The court finds that on September 27 2016‚ the accused committed the crime of public violence. He unlawfully assembled with intent to disturb the peace and public security and intentionally struck the police with stones using a slingshot‚” Magistrate Siphiwe Hlophe said.

“The court finds that on February 4 the accused participated in a public gathering at the Durban University of Technology and failed to comply with a police instruction to disperse. Accordingly he is found guilty.”

Sentencing has been set down for October.

READ MORE: Student leader Bonginkosi Khanyile aces studies while in jail

Khanyile, a former Durban University of Technology (DUT) student and student leader in the Economic Freedom Fighters’ Student Command, was arrested in 2016 during the #FeesMustFall protests.

The trial has taken over two years owing to several postponements.

Khanyile was granted bail in March 2017 after spending six months in Durban’s Westville prison. 

Gemma Ritchie

Gemma Ritchie

Gemma Ritchie works in the Mail & Guardian's online department. She majored in English Literature at a small liberal arts college in the USA.  Read more from Gemma Ritchie

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