London, Paris, Berlin demand ‘credible’ Khashoggi probe

Britain, France and Germany insisted Sunday that “light must be shed” on the whereabouts of journalist Jamal Khashoggi as they called for a credible investigation into his disappearance.

In a joint statement, Britain’s foreign minister Jeremy Hunt, his French counterpart Jean-Yves Le Drian and Germany’s Heiko Maas said whoever was responsible for the Saudi journalist’s disappearance must be held to account.

Khashoggi, a Washington Post contributor, vanished after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on October 2 to obtain official documents for his upcoming marriage.

“Defending freedom of expression and a free press and ensuring the protection of journalists are key priorities for Germany, the United Kingdom and France,” the ministers said in a statement issued by the Foreign Office in London.

“In this spirit, light must be shed on the disappearance of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi,” it said, indicating all three countries were treating the matter “with the utmost seriousness”.


“There needs to be a credible investigation to establish the truth about what happened, and — if relevant — to identify those bearing responsibility for the disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi, and ensure that they are held to account.

While expressing support for joint Saudi-Turkish efforts to look into his disappearance, they said the Saudi government must provide “a complete and detailed response”, indicating that such a message had been conveyed “directly” to Riyadh.

Turkish officials say they believe Khashoggi was killed inside the Saudi mission and lurid claims suggesting he was tortured and even dismembered have been leaked to the media.

Following the statement, Hunt spoke to media at the foreign secretary’s Chevening country residence, and challenged Riyadh to explain what happened to Khashoggi.

“The country that can help us get to the bottom of this is Saudi Arabia,” he said.

“If, as they say, this terrible murder didn’t happen then where is Jamal Khashoggi? That is what the world wants to know.

“If they have got nothing to hide then they will, and should, co-operate.”

Saudi Arabia warned on Sunday it would retaliate against any sanctions imposed on the oil-rich kingdom over Khashoggi’s disappearance, as the Riyadh stock market plunged on growing investor jitters.

© Agence France-Presse

Subscribe to the M&G

These are unprecedented times, and the role of media to tell and record the story of South Africa as it develops is more important than ever.

The Mail & Guardian is a proud news publisher with roots stretching back 35 years, and we’ve survived right from day one thanks to the support of readers who value fiercely independent journalism that is beholden to no-one. To help us continue for another 35 future years with the same proud values, please consider taking out a subscription.

Agency
External source

Related stories

SAA bailout raises more questions

As the government continues to grapple with the troubles facing the airline, it would do well to keep on eye on the impending Denel implosion

Khaya Sithole: What’s the state’s role in business?

State participation is valid when the market can’t deliver what’s needed, such as roads and rail networks and telecommunications. But banks and airlines are private enterprise concerns

US ‘brokered’ agreements on Israel: Wind of change or toxic blast of extortion?

The United States is negotiating with African countries that will see them exchange Palestinian people’s rights for improved economic and trade conditions

Where do Africans study abroad?

China is becoming the preferred destination for countries such as Ghana and Nigeria

Bank guarantees foil Denel’s R4.5-bn Egypt contract

Loss of work is the last thing the beleaguered state enterprise needs

‘Killing the chicken to scare the monkey’: what Jimmy Lai’s arrest means for Hong Kong’s independent media

Although self-censorship has long been a concern, Hong Kong has traditionally enjoyed a vibrant free press
Advertising

Subscribers only

Covid-19 surges in the Eastern Cape

With people queuing for services, no water, lax enforcement of mask rules and plenty of partying, the virus is flourishing once again, and a quarter of the growth is in the Eastern Cape

Ace prepares ANC branches for battle

ANC secretary general Ace Magashule is ignoring party policy on corruption-charged officials and taking his battle to branch level, where his ‘slate capture’ strategy is expected to leave Ramaphosa on the ropes

More top stories

Journey through anxious Joburg

A new book has collected writing about the condition of living, yes, with a high crime rate, but also other, more pervasive existential urban stresses particular to the Global South

Football legend Maradona dies

The Argentinian icon died at his home on Wednesday, two weeks after having surgery on a blood clot in his brain

Why no vaccine at all is better than a botched...

As Covid vaccines near the manufacturing stage, a look at two polio vaccines provides valuable historical insights

Under cover of Covid, Uganda targets LGBTQ+ shelter

Pandemic rules were used to justify a violent raid on a homeless shelter in Uganda, but a group of victims is pursuing a criminal case against the perpetrators
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…