JP Smith, Cape Town City safety boss faces vote of no confidence

 

 

Cape Town’s mayoral committee member for Safety and Security JP Smith could face the axe as the Democratic Alliance’s (DA) deputy caucus leader in the City of Cape Town.

The Mail and Guardian is in possession of a motion that has been tabled by Smith’s council and caucus colleague Courtney Van Wyk.

In that motion Van Wyk notes findings of the so-called Steenhuisen Report into tensions in the party in the Cape Metro.

This is the same report that was used as the basis to remove former mayor Patricia De Lille from office.

Van Wyk’s motion said the report found Smith at the “centre of heightened tensions and disunity within the caucus.”


“This is not the first example of destructive behaviour (from Smith) within the Caucus,” the motion reads.

“Several formal complaints of similar egregious behavior have been reported to the caucus executive.”

Van Wyk accuses Smith of plotting to remove the DA’s Cape Metro regional chairperson Grant Twigg.

Twigg recently survived his own motion of no confidence in his position of metro chairperson.

The motion claims Smith admitted to this apparently saying he was trying to “Save the DA.”

READ MORE: DA elections test for new party leader

Smith confirmed that the motion will face a vote on Monday morning.

“It’s an internal party matter, so I can’t speak to the media about it… I’m a democrat. I’ll abide by the decision. I respect the right of the mover to move the motion. I believe that the contents of the motion can be readily disproved.”

Smith said the motion against him doesn’t have anything to do with issues playing out in the national DA leadership, but over disagreements in the Cape DA.

The DA has been putting out fires on all fronts in recent weeks.

From murmurs of the removal of party leader Mmusi Maimane, to a bruising internal leadership battle for Federal Executive chairperson between former leader Helen Zille, former Nelson Mandela Bay Mayor Athol Trollip, and DA MPs Mike Waters, and Thomas Walters.

READ MORE: Zille, Trollip faves for fedex head

In another part of the country, Trollip could soon again be donning the mayoral chain.

A vote of no confidence is expected in the United Democratic Movement’s Mongameli Bobani on Tuesday. If he’s removed, Trollip is likely to replace him.

The City of Cape Town is the only metro where the DA won a clear majority in the 2016 local government elections. 

Subscribe to the M&G

These are unprecedented times, and the role of media to tell and record the story of South Africa as it develops is more important than ever.

The Mail & Guardian is a proud news publisher with roots stretching back 35 years, and we’ve survived right from day one thanks to the support of readers who value fiercely independent journalism that is beholden to no-one. To help us continue for another 35 future years with the same proud values, please consider taking out a subscription.

Lester Kiewit
Lester Kiewit
Lester Kiewit is a Reporter, Journalist, and Broadcaster.

Related stories

Advertising

Subscribers only

Q&A Sessions: George Euvrard, the brains behind our cryptic crossword

George Euvrard spoke to Athandiwe Saba about his passion for education, clues on how to solve his crosswords and the importance of celebrating South Africa.

Poachers in prisons tell their stories

Interviews with offenders provide insight into the structure of illegal wildlife trade networks

More top stories

No one should be as rich as Elon Musk

The reactions to Elon Musk’s billionaire status are evidence that far too many South Africans have not fully grasped the destructive consequences of inequality. Entrepreneur...

Department of basic education edges closer to releasing matric results

The basic education department has said that it is almost done with the marking process and that the capturing of marks is in progress.

The rare fairytale of Percy Tau

Through much hard work and a bit of good fortune, the South African attacker has converted a potential horror story into magic

Somali troops may have been drawn into Ethiopia’s civil war

The Mail & Guardian spoke to Somalis about their relatives who disappeared after signing up for military training and fear they may have been killed
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…