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Another board member walks away from CSA

 

 

Jack Madiseng, the president of the Central Gauteng Lions, has become the latest board member to step away from Cricket SA (CSA). Eight of the 12 board members that began December now remain at the organisation.

“I would like to thank you for welcoming me into the CSA leadership,” Madiseng wrote to CSA president Chris Nenzani in his resignation letter, which the Mail & Guardian has seen. “Unfortunately moral and principle circumstances forced me to consider this action after witnessing the Board refusing to take accountability and stepping down at the members council meeting that was held on the 06 December 2019.”

CSA held crunch talks last Friday after a turbulent week that saw various bodies, including the Central Gauteng Lions and South African Cricketers’ Association, call for the entire board to be removed. At the press briefing the following day, however, Nenzani stood resolute and said it was unnecessary to jump to that resort. The bulk of the responsibility for the crisis of South African cricket, he seemed to imply, lay at the feet of now-suspended chief executive Thabang Moroe.

READ MORE: If you can’t beat ’em, dodge ’em: South African cricket’s accountability problem

Madiseng becomes the fourth member to resign since the cancelling of the media accreditation of five journalists brought scrutiny to CSA’s door almost two weeks ago. He follows Iqbal Khan, Shirley Zinn and Dawn Mokhobo in stepping down – the reasons given ranged from poor corporate governance to credit card abuse.

In the last week, CSA hace appointed former Proteas captain Graeme Smith as the acting director of cricket and Jacques Faul as its interim chief executive as it desperately tries to restore a sense of credibility in the eyes of the public. 

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Luke Feltham
Luke Feltham is a features writer at the Mail & Guardian

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