Get more Mail & Guardian
Subscribe or Login

Rose says Premier League players treated like ‘lab rats’

England defender Danny Rose says players are being treated like “lab rats” after Watford and Burnley revealed they were among the Premier League clubs affected by six positive tests for the coronavirus.

Teams have started socially-distanced training in small groups this week, but several Premier League stars have expressed concerns about plans to resume the season.

The Premier League conducted 748 tests on players and staff on Sunday and Monday as part of their bid to restart matches in June.

Burnley assistant manager Ian Woan, one unnamed Watford player and two members of the Vicarage Road staff tested positive in the first batch of medical checks.

While the positive test numbers were relatively low, Rose has joined Watford captain Troy Deeney and Manchester City pair Sergio Aguero and Raheem Sterling in speaking out about the potential health risks of pressing ahead with “Project Restart”.

Rose, currently on loan at Newcastle from Tottenham, told the Lockdown Tactics podcast: “People are suggesting we should go back to football, like we’re guinea pigs or lab rats. We’re going to experiment this phase and see if it works or not.

“I can just imagine people at home saying, ‘Well they earn that amount of money so they should be going back’.

“For stuff like that I think, is it worth the hassle? I could be potentially risking my health for people’s entertainment and that’s not something I want to be involved in, if I’m honest.”

Safety fears

Deeney has refused to start training because he does not want to put his young child, who has breathing difficulties, at risk of catching the virus.

The 31-year-old had already made it clear he fears his family could be in danger because of figures that show black and ethnic minorities are more likely to become seriously ill with the virus.

Deeney’s decision came just hours before Watford released information about their positive tests.

“Of those three positive tests, one is a player and two are members of staff. All three have asked that medical confidentiality be respected and, therefore, the club will not be naming those involved,” Watford said in a statement.

The other two positive tests were at a third club, the details of which have not been revealed.

The Premier League has been suspended since March 13, but with the Bundesliga returning to action in empty stadiums last week, it is hoped the English top-flight’s remaining 92 matches can be played behind closed doors.

Subscribe for R500/year

Thanks for enjoying the Mail & Guardian, we’re proud of our 36 year history, throughout which we have delivered to readers the most important, unbiased stories in South Africa. Good journalism costs, though, and right from our very first edition we’ve relied on reader subscriptions to protect our independence.

Digital subscribers get access to all of our award-winning journalism, including premium features, as well as exclusive events, newsletters, webinars and the cryptic crossword. Click here to find out how to join them and get a 57% discount in your first year.

Agency
External source

Related stories

WELCOME TO YOUR M&G

If you’re reading this, you clearly have great taste

If you haven’t already, you can subscribe to the Mail & Guardian for less than the cost of a cup of coffee a week, and get more great reads.

Already a subscriber? Sign in here

Advertising

Subscribers only

R350 social relief grant not enough to live on

Nearly half of the population in South Africa — one of the most unequal countries in the world — is considered chronically poor.

More top stories

The Mental Health Care Act and the art of patient...

But, for greedy relations, unscrupulous lawyers and other “experts”, it can be a license to plunder the unfortunate

Afrobeats conquer the world

From Grammys to sold-out concerts, the West African music phenomenon is going mainstream

R350 social relief grant not enough to live on

Nearly half of the population in South Africa — one of the most unequal countries in the world — is considered chronically poor.

US fashion contaminates Africa’s water

Untreated effluent from textile factories in in Lesotho, Ethiopia, Kenya, Mauritius and Madagascar pours into rivers, contaminating the water
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…
×