Afghanistan’s poppy fields bloom

The Taliban’s return to power in Afghanistan after it seized the country’s capital, Kabul, in mid-August saw tens of thousands of people flee the country. Afghans who remain are now dependent on the Taliban to govern the war-torn country. But where does this leave the world’s leading opium poppy-producing country? 

In contrast to the war-ravaged Asian nation, illicit networks of heroin traders flourish. And the Taliban’s political survival depends on maintaining an illicit market even though it might outweigh financial gains from it. 

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Eunice Stoltz
Eunice Stoltz is a general news reporter at the Mail & Guardian.

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