Thai floods kill 224, inundate World Heritage Site

At least 224 people have died in flooding in Thailand that has inundated the 400-year-old World Heritage Site in the ancient city of Ayutthaya.

At least 224 people have died in flooding in Thailand since mid-July and water has inundated the 400-year-old Chai Wattanaram temple in the ancient city of Ayutthaya, a World Heritage Site, officials said on Tuesday.

The temple is by the Chao Phraya river, which flows down to the capital, Bangkok, around 105km to the south.

“The water level is now up to 1.5 metres and 150 soldiers are deployed in the area to fix the embankment,” said Wittaya Pewpong, governor of Ayutthaya province.

He said more than 200 of the 500 ancient temples in the province had been affected by floods .


Thailand has been hit by massive flooding caused by a tropical storm followed by seasonal monsoon rains, which usually fall from August to October.

Culture Minister Sukumol Kunplome put the damage to historical sites around the country at at least 100 million baht ($3.2 million).

Flooding has also affected Bangkok, which sits only two metres above sea level. The Chao Phraya river has overflowed into roads in some areas, although the authorities have reinforced its banks to prevent serious flooding.

Several trains to the north had been suspended because of the flooding, the Department of Disaster Prevention and Mitigation said.

Nearly 1.2-million hectares of farmland was under water and the Meteorological Department has warned of more heavy rain in many parts of the country over the next few days.

The government has approved at least $256 million in compensation for farmers and other people affected by floods.

In neighbouring Cambodia, 164 people have died in floods since August 13.

Keo Vy, deputy information director of the Cambodian National Disaster Management Committee, said more than 215 000 families had been displaced while roads, bridges and dikes had been destroyed.

“Affected people are facing the challenge of a lack of food,” he said.

More than 300 000 hectares (120 000 acres) of farmland was under water, he added. — Reuters

These are unprecedented times, and the role of media to tell and record the story of South Africa as it develops is more important than ever. But it comes at a cost. Advertisers are cancelling campaigns, and our live events have come to an abrupt halt. Our income has been slashed.

The Mail & Guardian is a proud news publisher with roots stretching back 35 years. We’ve survived thanks to the support of our readers, we will need you to help us get through this.

To help us ensure another 35 future years of fiercely independent journalism, please subscribe.

Advertising

Only three grades to return to school on Monday

Only grades six, 11 and R will return to school as expected, with the rest to be phased in later in the month

Gauteng health MEC Bandile Masuku’s first rule: Don’t panic

As Gauteng braces for its Covid-19 peak, the province’s MEC for health, Bandile Masuku, is putting his training to the test as he leads efforts to tackle the impending public health crisis
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…

The best local and international journalism

handpicked and in your inbox every weekday