Murder most foul as body is found on queen’s estate

British police are treating the discovery of a body on the queen’s Sandringham estate as murder.

A woman’s body was found on the vast estate in eastern England on New Year’s Day and Detective Chief Inspector Jes Fry said authorities were examining missing person reports and unsolved cases around the country to see if there were any links.

“We are at the very early stages of the investigation and it could be a complex inquiry,” Fry said on Tuesday. “The body had been there for some time.”

Authorities are doing a post-mortem on the body on Tuesday.

A member of the public found the body in a woodland at Anmer, a tiny village 185km north-east of London. The village is part of the Sandringham estate where the royal family spends some of its holidays.


The hamlet of Anmer is home to several dozen people and sits around 4.8km from Sandringham House, which has served as a private residence for British monarchs since 1862.

Queen Elizabeth II and her husband Prince Philip spent part of the holiday season there and were at Sandringham House on New Year’s Day.

Sandringham Estate’s website says the entire estate is spread over 8 000 hectares in Norfolk. Sandringham House and its gardens make up 24 hectares, and there are 240 hectares of woods and open countryside in a section that is open to the public free of charge all year.

There are also two stud farms and a fruit farm. The estate employs over 100 full-time staff.

Buckingham Palace referred all questions about the body’s discovery back to police. — Sapa-AP

Subscribe to the M&G for R2 a month

These are unprecedented times, and the role of media to tell and record the story of South Africa as it develops is more important than ever.

The Mail & Guardian is a proud news publisher with roots stretching back 35 years, and we’ve survived right from day one thanks to the support of readers who value fiercely independent journalism that is beholden to no-one. To help us continue for another 35 future years with the same proud values, please consider taking out a subscription.

And for this weekend only, you can become a subscriber by paying just R2 a month for your first three months.

Meera Selva
Meera Selva works from Oxford, England. Director of journalism fellowship, Reuters Institute For The Study of Journalism at Oxford via Singapore, Berlin, London, Nairobi, Cardiff, Jaffna. Meera Selva has over 1378 followers on Twitter.

Related stories

What does the ruling on the suspension of British parliament mean?

The court said that the advice the PM had given to the queen, who formally issued the prorogation order, was "unlawful, void and of no effect"

In Royal News: Meghan and Harry are pregnant

Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are expecting a baby in the Spring of 2019

Handshakes that shook the world

When the leaders of North and South Korea reached across the Military Demarcation Line to shake hands, they symbolically united the peninsula

God save the Queen: Trump’s visit should be downgraded to spare Queen – ex-official

More than 1.6 million people have signed a petition to cancel the state visit.

British royals deny sex claims against Prince Andrew

Royal officials come to the defense of Prince Andrew following claims of a sexual nature made against the Duke of York.

Queen Elizabeth hospitalised with gastroenteritis

Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, suffering from gastroenteritis, was admitted to hospital on Sunday, a Buckingham Palace spokesperson has told AFP.
Advertising

Subscribers only

ANC: ‘We’re operating under conditions of anarchy’

In its latest policy documents, the ANC is self-critical and wants ‘consequence management’, yet it’s letting its members off the hook again

Q&A Sessions: ‘I think I was born way before my...

The chief executive of the Estate Agency Affairs Board and the deputy chair of the SABC board, shares her take on retrenchments at the public broadcaster and reveals why she hates horror movies

More top stories

DRC: Tshisekedi and Kabila fall out

The country’s governing coalition is under strain, which could lead to even more acrimony ahead

Editorial: Crocodile tears from the coalface

Pumping limited resources into a project that is predominantly meant to extend dirty coal energy in South Africa is not what local communities and the climate needs.

Klipgat residents left high and dry

Flushing toilets were installed in backyards in the North West, but they can’t be used because the sewage has nowhere to go

Nehawu leaders are ‘betraying us’

The accusation by a branch of the union comes after it withdrew from a parliamentary process
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…