Government confirms Mandela ambulance break-down

"All care was taken to ensure that Madiba's medical condition was not compromised by the unforeseen incident," spokesperson Mac Maharaj said on Saturday.

"Doctors attending to Madiba are satisfied that the former president suffered no harm during this period." Mandela (94) was hospitalised in the early hours of June 8 with a recurring lung infection.

Maharaj said the fully equipped military ICU (intensive care unit) ambulance had a specialised medical staff on board including intensive care specialists and ICU nurses. It was accompanied by two quick response vehicles. "When the ambulance experienced engine problems it was decided to transfer to another military ambulance," he said.

On Friday, Mandela's grandson Ndaba Mandela was quoted in the Star as saying the ailing former statesman was expected to be discharged "soon". Ndaba said his family was grateful for Madiba's life and they were not ready to contemplate his death.

"Only God can take him … but for us, as family, as long as he can still hear and understand what is said to him, and talk to us, we'll continue to celebrate him."


'Unresponsive'
​On Friday, United States-based CBS News reported that Mandela's liver and kidneys were functioning at 50%, and that the ailing former statesman had two procedures, one to repair a bleeding ulcer and another to insert a tube.

According to the report, Mandela had not opened his eyes in days and was unresponsive. However, Maharaj said the presidency has been the "source for authoritative reporting on Mandela's health".

"Our reports are based on the reports we receive from doctors. We avoid clinical details because we want to ensure no transgression into the privacy of Mandela and his family is ensured," Maharaj said.

"The presidency needs to ensure the dignity of the former president and need to ensure the circumstances are not surrounded by undignified speculative reports."

He said the update that Mandela was in a "serious but stable" condition still stands. Family members have been seen entering and leaving the Medi-Clinic Heart Hospital in Pretoria for the last two weeks. – Sapa

Subscribe to the M&G

These are unprecedented times, and the role of media to tell and record the story of South Africa as it develops is more important than ever.

The Mail & Guardian is a proud news publisher with roots stretching back 35 years, and we’ve survived right from day one thanks to the support of readers who value fiercely independent journalism that is beholden to no-one. To help us continue for another 35 future years with the same proud values, please consider taking out a subscription.

Sapa
Guest Author

Related stories

Advertising

Subscribers only

Q&A Sessions: Marcia Mayaba —Driven to open doors for women

Marcia Mayaba has been in the motor industry for 24 years, donning hats that include receptionist, driver, fuel attendant, dealer principal and now chief...

The war on women in video game culture

Women and girls make up almost half of the gaming community but are hardly represented and face abuse in the industry

More top stories

Gatvol Capetonians, EFF lash out at City of Cape Town...

Public infrastructure was allegedly damaged by the activist group in 2019 and by the Economic Freedom Fighters in 2020

Masuku loses appeal against SIU report on Covid graft

The judge found that when news of improprieties were brought to his attention, Masuku did not take steps to urgently intervene

Leaking De Ruyter’s affidavit countering racism claims was ‘malicious’ and...

Mkhuleko Hlengwa has pointed to people in Eskom or the public enterprises department for making the document public

SABS ‘contemplates’ 170 retrenchments to save R150m

Salaries account for 65% of the South African Bureau of Standards’ total operating‌ costs
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…