Final act: Axed Generations stars go to court

Fourteen of the 16 Generations actors fired from the local soapie last year have made a final court bid to take the new series off air, City Press reported on Sunday.

The group filed an application at the High Court in Johannesburg on Thursday. In the application, against Generations creator Mfundi Vundla’s company and SABC, the Generations Actors’ Guild reportedly said the new Generations The Legacy was “unconstitutional” and “invalid”, as procurement regulations were flouted.

The 14 actors reportedly said the national broadcaster violated procurement prescripts contained in the Constitution by commissioning a new show while there were still contracts in place for the previous show, which were only set to expire in December next year.

“The production and broadcasting of Generations The Legacy will also have to be cancelled, since the parties involved in its commissioning flaunted (sic) every procurement guideline that should have been adhered to,” the actors’ lawyer Bulelani Mzamo was quoted as saying.

“These agreements cost more than R60-million of the taxpayers’ money per annum – and to cancel them midway at the slightest provocation is just unconscionable.” According to the paper Vundla said this was “old news” and the actors “must get a life and move on”.


“We have a very different storyline. We are not going back,” he was quoted as saying. – Sapa

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