Concourt to rule on proceedings to impeach Zuma

Opposition parties argued that despite the Concourt judgement in March 2016 which stated Zuma had failed to uphold the Constitution when making upgrades to his Nkandla home, the president had not faced any consequences. (Delwyn Verasamy/M&G)

Opposition parties argued that despite the Concourt judgement in March 2016 which stated Zuma had failed to uphold the Constitution when making upgrades to his Nkandla home, the president had not faced any consequences. (Delwyn Verasamy/M&G)

The Constitutional Court will deliver a judgement on Friday on an application to direct Parliament to begin impeachment proceedings against President Jacob Zuma.

The application was brought by the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF), the Congress of the People (Cope) and other opposition political parties.

In September, the Concourt reserved judgement in the matter.

Opposition parties argued that despite the Concourt judgement in March 2016 which stated Zuma had failed to uphold the Constitution when making upgrades to his Nkandla home, the president had faced no consequences as a result of the controversy.

READ MORE: Eight years on, the Nkandla scapegoats dwindle to one (and no, it’s not Zuma)

Cope told News24 that it had on Thursday morning that the Concourt would hand down the judgement on Friday.

“We are expecting the full judgment tomorrow,” Eric Mabuza, the attorney for the EFF, the United Democratic Movement and Cope in the matter, told News24.

The EFF and opposition parties have approached the courts for a declaratory order for Parliament to begin impeachment proceedings against Zuma and consider his conduct during the Nkandla saga.

READ MORE: [Archives] How do we impeach a president?

Opposition parties argued that an ad hoc committee should be established in Parliament to force Zuma to answer questions about the upgrades to his Nkandla home.

Zuma has yet to win a case that has been against him in the Concourt. 

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