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Bobi Wine gets bail

Ugandan singer-turned-politician Robert Kyagulanyi, better known as Bobi Wine, was released on bail Monday after two weeks in detention.

Kyagulanyi and 33 others, including two fellow serving MPs, are facing treason charges in a case that has triggered an international outcry.

They were arrested after stones were thrown at President Yoweri Museveni’s convoy, breaking a car window, as he visited the town of Arua to support the ruling-party candidate during a by-election.

On Monday, judge Stephen Mubiru at the high court in the northern town of Gulu released Kyagulanyi and some of his co-accused on bail.

Two serving opposition MPs, one former MP and the winner of the by-election, Kassiano Wadri, were also granted bail.

The defendants are due in court again on August 30.

A separate charge of weapons possession against Kyagulanyi was dropped by a military court last week.

READ MORE: ‘Ghetto president’ rattles Uganda

In court appearances Kyagulanyi has appeared subdued and hobbling, or used crutches. His lawyers and family claim he has been beaten and tortured while in detention, allegations denied by authorities.

Monday’s hearing was attended by a gallery of well-known opposition politicians, some of whom stood surety for the accused.

Nearly a hundred musicians, artists, activists and politicians last week signed an open letter condemning Kyagulanyi’s treatment.

Signatories included Chris Martin, Angelique Kidjo, Chrissie Hynde and Damon Albarn, writer Wole Soyinka and the deputy leader of Britain’s opposition Labour Party, Tom Watson.

© Agence France-Presse

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