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Adekeye Adebajo

Our psyches shy of the goal

Football has been fertile terrain for political analy­sis since the World Cup in Mexico when Henry Kissinger assessed the prospects of the favourites.

Obama: ‘Bush with a smile’?

It's one year since the US president's historic election. Has he become trapped in his own lofty rhetoric?

Broadway’s Nigerian fellow

Fela! brings the story of African superstar Fela Anikulapo Kuti to the mainstream.

Obama’s Nobel ancestry

Ten individuals of African descent have previously been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. But none had an opportunity as unique as Barack Obama's.

‘Natives are getting restless’

It is time for Africans to speak out against Afrophobia and change perceptions of the West.

Time for SA diplomats to get real

In light of South Africa's disappointing decision to refuse the Dalai Lama a visa, many analysts have pushed for a more human rights focus for South Africa's foreign policy.

Reversing the curse of Berlin

''Africa suffers from a curse, invoked in Europe. The Berlin conference of 1884 to 1885 carved Africa up into territories that reflected the compromises of European imperialists rather than the interests of African populations.'' Africa is still haunted by border designs concocted at a conference in 19th-century Europe, writes Adekeye Adebajo.

Life and times of a struggle hero

Adekeye Adebajo reviews Nigerian writer and political activist Wole Soyinka's memoirs.

Africa’s quest for El Dorado

POINT: In the grasping imagination of 19th-century European explorers, Mali's Timbuktu was a fabled city of gold. This week's African Union summit in Ghana evokes images of a similarly elusive quest for an African El Dorado. But putting old wine in new bottles will not integrate Africa, writes Adekeye Adebajo.

From Rhodes to Mbeki

The greatest imperialist of the 19th century, Cecil Rhodes, had a dream to establish dominion over Africa from the Cape to Cairo. Rhodes's heirs -- the racist governments in Pretoria -- historically saw Africa as an area of penetration, exploitation and destabilisation. This was the Africa of ''labour reserves'' from which hundreds of thousands of Southern African migrants ventured to South Africa.

SA at the UN: Don’t believe the hype

Winning a two-year non-permanent seat on the 15-member United Nations Security Council from January 2007, with an impressive 186 out of 192 votes, is a great achievement for South Africa. The euphoria has, however, tended to obscure the reality of how limited a role non-permanent members are able to play in council decisions.

SA at the UN: Don’t believe the hype

Winning a two-year non-permanent seat on the 15-member United Nations Security Council from January 2007, with an impressive 186 out of 192 votes, is a great achievement for South Africa. The euphoria has, however, tended to obscure the reality of how limited a role non-permanent members are able to play in council decisions.

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