Bhekisisa Team

The bad news about delivering bad news

Doctors have turned to scientific studies for guidance on talking with patients, but the results have largely left them guessing.

‘I don’t know how my children will survive’: Zimbabwe in crisis

Cyclone Idai washed away the crops that survived a savage drought, leaving 70% of the population in dire need of food.

Shots, myths & cash: The perilous road to curbing cancer

Before 2011, this country couldn’t prevent cervical cancer let alone screen for it. Since then everything’s changed.

Vote like a mother: Five things moms should ask politicians this election

Women – many of them mothers – constitute more than half of the population. What should moms think of before casting their vote?

‘It’s a godsend’: the healthcare scheme bringing hope to India’s sick

In a country where treatment can cost two years’ wages, a new project could mean free medical care for 500 million people.

Climate adaptation proves the bee’s knees for fishermen in Madagascar

In Kivalo, where cyclones, overfishing and rising seas threaten livelihoods, beekeeping offers an unlikely alternative to fishing.

Blessers, blessees and HIV: Do we know how to deal with age-disparate sex?

We invite you to our Policy Dialogue at the 9th annual Aids Conference.

This is what it’s like waking up during surgery

General anaesthetic is supposed to make surgery painless. Now there’s evidence that one person in 20 may be awake when doctors think they’re under.

Seven things that will make you think twice about the cost of drugs

Life-saving medicines are out of reach for many patients but a World Health Organisation meeting held in Johannesburg this week could change that.

A dictator’s unexpected legacy

Having banned female genital cutting, his ousting may have been good for democracy but bad for women’s bodies.

‘The family needs to see Sino’s bones, so we can be released from this pain’

When this toddler died at Leratong Hospital, his body disappeared. Here’s what happened when his parents went back there more than a decade later.

Did the Health Professions Council trade cash for qualifications?

If allegations prove true, it may mean that corruption at the regulator enabled unqualified people to masquerade as doctors and nurses.

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