Police pursuing ‘specific lead’ in Khayelitsha triple murder

The investigation into the murder of three young women killed execution-style in Cape Town’s Khayelitsha township on Monday night has not led to any arrests yet, but police are pursuing a specific lead. 

After the murders, the police in the Western Cape instituted a 72-hour activation plan, which gave them more resources to hunt for the women’s killers.

Western Cape police spokesperson Brigadier Novela Potelwa said “provincial detectives are following a specific lead hoping to make a breakthrough soon”.

Potelwa would not confirm whether the shootings were gang-related, saying it would be “premature to talk about the motive behind the killings”.

Police said residents had heard gunshots after 8pm on Monday, 27 September, after which the bodies of the three women, aged 17, 20 and 21, were discovered in a passage between shacks in the TT Block informal settlement of Khayelitsha.

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Eunice Stoltz
Eunice Stoltz is a general news reporter at the Mail & Guardian.

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