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Siyabonga, South Africa: Amla retires from international cricket

 

 

Proteas batsman Hashim Amla has announced his retirement from all forms of international cricket. He steps down as a true titan of the global game and one of the greatest to ever pad up for South Africa.

He remains available for domestic cricket and the Mzansi Super League.

“Firstly, all glory and thanks to the Almighty for granting me this Proteas journey which has been nothing but a joy and privilege,” Amla said on Thursday.

“I learned many lessons during this incredible ride, made many friends and most importantly shared in the love of a brotherhood.

“I would like to thank my parents for their prayers, love and support. It is their shadow over me that enabled me to play for years under the Proteas sun. Also, my family, friends and agent, my teammates and every member of the support staff throughout this incredible journey. A heartfelt thank you to every one of you.

“The fans for energising me when times were tough, and for celebrating with me when we succeeded together. Siyabonga, South Africa,” he said.

“And, of course, a very special thanks to the president and the board at Cricket South Africa – not forgetting chief executive officer Thabang Moroe, and his administrative team. I really appreciate all the opportunities and am truly grateful. Love and peace,” Amla concluded.

After making his Proteas debut in 2004, Amla would go on to play 124 Tests, 181 ODIs and 44 T20s. His 9 282 runs in red-ball cricket are bettered only by Jacques Kallis in the South African setup and his 8 113 one-day runs are the third-highest overall.

Amla has nonetheless garnered criticism in recent times for his shorter format play and was credited as one of the many who contributed to a disastrous World Cup campaign in England last month. His retirement follows that of Dale Steyn this week and is an unmistakable marker of a time of transition for the Proteas.

“It is always sad to bid farewell to one of the true legends of the game,” Cricket South Africa chief executive Thabang Moroe said.

“But at the same time, this is rather an occasion to celebrate the richness that Hashim has brought to the game around the world, both on and off the field.

“We can indeed be grateful that he remains available for our domestic cricket, and will continue to contribute by passing on his rich cricket and life experiences to our next generation of players,” Moroe added.

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Luke Feltham
Luke Feltham is a features writer at the Mail & Guardian

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