Gauteng residents sign up to save succulents

When Richard Hay put out a call on social media for Gauteng residents to do “something tangible” for conservation by helping sort and plant thousands of confiscated rare and endangered succulents, he didn’t expect the response he would get.

So far, more than 130 people have signed up, a response that has “blown away” the chairperson of the Pretoria branch of the Botanical Society of South Africa (BotSoc), a volunteer-based nonprofit focused on the conservation and cultivation of indigenous plants. 

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Sheree Bega
Sheree Bega is an environment reporter at the Mail & Guardian.

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