Q&A Sessions: Frank Chikane on the rainbow where colours never meet

Reverend Frank Chikane, former director-general in the presidency, has just completed six years as chairperson of the Kagiso Trust, which has built schools and halls at a fraction of the price the government would pay. He speaks to Carien Du Plessis about corruption, his children’s political views and how churches can be better mobilised


Would you ever go back to work for the government?

If the government wants to use my experience, it is welcome, but I don’t have to go back and be a public servant. If you went as far as the head of the presidency, there is nothing beyond that, actually. I went to the government to serve. It had nothing to do with personal ambitions.

There’s a lot more to this story.

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Carien Du Plessis
Jill of all trades but really, mistress of none, Carien has of late been a political tourist chasing elections and summits in various parts of the world, especially in Africa. After spending her student days at political rallies in South Africa right through the country's first democratic elections in 1994, and after an extended working holiday in London, Carien started working for newspapers full-time in 2003. She's pretty much had her share of reporting on South African politics, attending gatherings and attracting trolls, but still finds herself attracted to it like a moth to a veld fire. Her ultimate ambition in life is to become a travelling chocolate writer of international fame.

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